Exhibit Information

Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

Address 11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY 10019

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Phone Number 212-708-9400

Website http://www.moma.org

GERMAN EXPRESSIONISM

Opening: 27 MARCH 2011 - Closing: 11 JULY 2011

GERMAN EXPRESSIONISM:

The Graphic Impulse


It’s a curiosity of this challenging MoMA Survey of Expressionist-Graphics & Print-Making before & after The Great War, that Austria seems to be merely a dependency of Germany.

 

It is certainly not treated that way farther up Fifth Avenue, where Viennese-Expressionism is on show at the Neue Galerie.

 

Nonetheless, Vienna’s unique Expressionists are not neglected at MoMA, in this, the first such survey at the Museum of Modern Art since 1957!

 

All the sketches, woodcuts, engravings, prints, lithos, books, & catalogues—even some important paintings—are from MoMA’s own vaults.

 

Here are Dresden’s artists of Die Brücke: Erich Heckel, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, & Max Pechstein.

 

There are the artists of Der Blaue Reiter, Munich’s Vassily Kandinsky, August Macke & Franz Marc.

 

Beyond German-Borders are the Viennese: Oskar Kokoshka & Egon Schiele.

 

Drawn to Berlin—which was becoming an Artist’s-Magnet—were Emil Nolde, Lyonel Feininger, Ludwig Meidner, & Wilhelm Lehmbruck.

 

The Catastrophe of World War I—but they couldn‘t then know that No. II was not so far-off—temporarily delayed developments in Expressionist-Graphics.

 

But it also provided such artists as Otto Dix & Käthe Kollwitz with horrific Subject-Matter for series of etchings & woodcuts.

 

George Grosz’s Gott mit Uns savagely caricatured Prussian War-Lords, but he also visually-pilloried Weimar-Republic Fat-Cats.

 

The Cynicism & Corruption that infected Post-War Germany—especially Berlin—was shockingly-detailed in the work of Otto Dix & Max Beckmann.

 

Known now to some Art-Historians as Post-Expressionism, its name then was Die Neue Sächlichkeit: a New-Objectivity. Things as they really are…

 

Anchoring this show are some notable Self-Portraits: Max Beckmann, Lovis Corinth, Otto Dix, Oskar Kokoshka, & Egon Schiele.

 

What came in the wake of World War II is quite Another-Story

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